Iza Hussin

Iza Hussin

Iza Hussin
Ph.D., Washington, 2008

Major Areas of Interest:

- Comparative Politics
- Religion, Politics, and the State
- Middle East, Southeast Asia, South Asia
- Law and Society
- Islam and Colonialism

Selected Publications:

- "The Pursuit of the Perak Regalia: Law and the Making of the Colonial State," Law and Social Inquiry 32, No. 3 (2007)
- "Ethnicity, Religion and the Paradox of Jurisdiction: Two Malaysian Cases," Yearbook of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law, (2010)
- "The Making of Islamic Law: Local Elites and Colonial Authority in British Malaya," in Thomas Dubois, ed. Casting Faiths: Technology and the Creation of Religion in East and Southeast Asia, Palgrave Macmillan (2008)

E-Mail: hussin@uchicago.edu
Website: http://home.uchicago.edu/~hussin/
Phone: (773) 702-4448
Office: Pick 513


Iza Hussin’s recent work has focussed upon the mobility of law and legal projects in empire, and upon the politics of Islamic law in both contemporary and colonial periods. Her book on the transformation of Islamic law and the Muslim state during British colonisation in India, Malaya and Egypt, The Politics of Islamic Law: Local Elites, Colonial Authority and the Making of the Muslim State, is forthcoming from the University of Chicago Press. Recent publications in journals and edited volumes include: “The Pursuit of the Perak Regalia: Law and the Making of the Colonial State,” Law and Social Inquiry 32:3 (2007); “Ethnicity, Religion and the Paradox of Jurisdiction: Two Malaysian Cases,” Yearbook of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law, 2010; and “The Making of Islamic Law: Local Elites and Colonial Authority in British Malaya,” in Thomas Dubois, ed. Casting Faiths: Technology and the Creation of Religion in East and Southeast Asia, Palgrave Macmillan 2008. Her new research includes a collaborative project on Internet fatwa and a second book project on the mobility of law across the Indian Ocean arena.

Professor Hussin’s work is based upon comparative, archival and textual research in Arabic, Malay and English texts across various sites of empire and legal transformation, and has been supported by grants from the National Science Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. She has been a Fellow in Islamic Legal Studies at Harvard Law School and is a recipient of awards from the American Political Science Association and the International Convention of Asia Scholars.